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jetrocketskates:

me and my friends started doing “neural handshakes” at parties, which is when we do shots of jaeger, but with our faces next to eachother and arms intertwined and we yell INITIATING NEURAL HANDSHAKE and then drink

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homemadehorrors:

victoriousvocabulary:

MARTYAXWAR

[noun]

known as a manticore in English; a mythical animal typically depicted as having the body of a lion, the head of a man, and the sting of a scorpion. It was thought to have romaed the jungles of India and, like the Sphinx, would ask travellers a riddle and kill them when they failed to answer it.

Etymology: from early middle Persian, مارتیا martya, “man” (as in human) and خوار xwar- “to eat”.

[Wen Hsu]

Relevant reblog…

Source: victoriousvocabulary
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osiemfr:

s h a m e  o n  y o u

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4-panel-life:

sweats nervously

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crimewave420:

unregistered-hypercam2:

all forms of shipping are disgusting and shameful

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korkrunchcereal:

allandaros:

dr-archeville:

teaandbrimstone:

intheindigo:

sourcedumal:

note-a-bear:

ooooooh

OOOH LOOK AT THAT HISTORICAL ACCURACY THO

I think he’s the man that The 13th Warrior was loosely based upon.

Viking and Islamic trade and cooperation is very old and It’s believed much of the Norse steelforging techniques were taught to them by Arabic scholars and smiths.

This is from The Viking World, a compilation of scholarly papers on various subjects relating to the Viking Age, compiled and edited by Stefan Brink & Neil Price.  This is from chapter 39, “Vikings and Islam,” by Egil Mikkelsen (which you can read for free here).  Here’s the stuff above in text form:

The most famous Arabic source concerning the descriptions of the Vikings is Ibn Fadlan who wrote an account of a journey from Baghdad to the Volga Bulgars in 921-2. His main task was to spread the Muslim faith to this people (Wikander 1978).  He tells that he saw among these people 5,000 men and women, who had all converted to Islam.  They were called al-baringȃr, which is interpreted as an Arabic rendering of the Old Norse name væringar, another name for Vikings (Lewicki 1972: 12; Wikander 1978: 21).  Ibn Fadlan built a mosque of wood for them to perform Islamic service and he taught them to pray.  There are some difficulties in interpreting this part of the Arabic

And, yes, elements of Ibn Fadlan's account were used in Michael Crichton's novel Eaters of the Dead, which was adapted to film in The 13th Warrior with Antonio Banderas as Ibn Fadlan.

A bit far afield for my usual stuff, but I figure it merits posting still. 

Neat

Source: everythingrhymeswithalcohol